Small town storytelling connects us in ways that more modern forms of communication don't.

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Something is getting lost in our kinetic world of emails, texts, and social media. Authentic connectivity.

Facebook status updates and Instagram photos keep us compulsively connected.  But the connection is limited.  Our social media revolution was the brain child of brilliant minds that were in many ways socially handicapped. A virtual world of “social” interaction was created to accommodate real world social deficiencies.  And now that virtual world is crowding out the real world.  Is it social evolution or social regression?

Small towns are interesting places.  People live up close and personal. Their lives bump up against each other. Their collective stories make up the narrative of their small communities. And because neighbors know each other stories, the absence of every life leaves a tangible void in the community’s collective narrative.

Can we create a kind of digital small town ?  Can we use the tools of modern technology to slowly reclaim the concept of authentic connectivity?  That is the new experiment at Cain’s River.

Cain’s River is built upon the endangered art of small town story telling.  The art of mixing fact with flavor and turning mundane topics into timeless tales of American life.

We collect stories.  Stories rooted in the “little things” that collectively make up a lifetime.  Stories that eternalize the unique cultural nuances of small town life.  Stories that entertain.  Stories that educate.  Stories that elucidate.  We collect these stories because they connect us.

Our Team

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Jed Cain grew up in the small town of Natchitoches, Louisiana as the son of a Methodist minister.  He married his high school sweet heart, Holly, with whom he now has three children.  Jed is a practicing trial lawyer who represents injured workers and their families.  Cain’s River was conceived out of the simple notion that small town storytelling connects us in ways that more modern forms of communication don’t.  It should be promoted and preserved. 

Jed Cain – Founder

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Holly is a pediatric registered nurse and mother of three with deep familial roots in Natchitoches Parish (made famous by the movie Steel Magnolias).  From managing a pediatric clinic to chairing a children’s museum fundraiser, Holly continues to use her small town experiences to cultivate growth in her community.  Holly is the Social Chair at Cain’s River.  She handles all aspects of community outreach including the management of the scholarship program. 

Holly Cain – Social Chair

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A self-professed “grammar nerd,” Laura Knoll is the Managing Editor at Cain’s River.   Laura’s upbringing is antithetical to small town life, having been born and raised in New York City.  A subsequent marriage to a “country boy” brought her to the small town of Marksville, Louisiana.  A mother of 3 small and rambunctious children, Laura now practices law at a small family-owned law firm in Marksville.  Laura’s unique transition from Manhattan to Marksville informs and shapes her perspective and appreciation of small town culture and tradition. 

Laura Knoll – Managing Editor